To call a spade a spade

    This phrase derives from an ancient Greek expression: “to call a fig a fig, a trough a trough”. It is first recorded in Aristophanes’ play The Clouds (423 B.C.), and was also used by Plutarch in his Moralia half a century later .Apparently some scholars believe that both …

Manners maketh man………….

  As England became more prosperous in the 16th century there was a renewed focus on etiquette and manners. As befitting the influence of the renaissance this was also a time which saw a renewed interest in ‘household ordinances and serving manuals’- namely a series of Anglo-Latin courtesy poems which …

Descartes and his cross-eyed women…….

René Descartes (1596–1650) the French philosopher, mathematician and writer is perhaps the only example of a sexual eccentricity changing the history of Western thought. For René “I think, therefore I am” Descartes had a fetish for cross-eyed women which he believed came from a childhood fascination with a cross-eyed playmate …

A brief history of dentures…..

The Etruscans, who inhabited Italy in the area that is modern Tuscany, are regarded as the best dentists of the ancient world. They extracted decayed teeth, replacing them with full or partial dentures, in which individual teeth were realistically carved from ivory or bone and bridgework was crafted in gold. …

Honcho……

  It sounds like Spanish, doesn’t it? But in fact, it comes from the Japanese word “hancho,” which has its origins in Middle Chinese. “Han” translates as “squad,” and “cho” means “chief,” which is a common suffix in Japanese for words that denote leadership— “kocho,” for example, means “head master …